The Top 10 Vietnamese Breakfast Meals

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Vietnam is a country that wakes up early. The parks and sidewalks fill up quickly with people doing their morning stretches and strolling around to loosen their legs. But before the real work can get going, people need fuel. Here are the favorite breakfasts in Vietnam listed by Culture Trip.

Bánh mì

The bánh mì is the Vietnamese breakfast sandwich. It’s cheap, hearty, tasty and portable. For people in a hurry to get to work or school, the bánh mì is the perfect breakfast on the go. The story of how this humble sandwich became the breakfast of choice for millions is a surprisingly interesting one as well. Read all about it here.

Put it in your budget under 'delicious' | © T.Tseng/Flickr

Put it in your budget under ‘delicious’ | © T.Tseng/Flickr

Xôi

Every day in Vietnam you see kids tromping off to school, swinging their xôi breakfast in little plastic bags. It’s a glutinous rice base with any number of toppings, including fried onions, mung beans, quail eggs and sliced sausage.

A lump of breakfast | © ayustety/Flickr

A lump of breakfast | © ayustety/Flickr

Bún chả giò

There’s dozens of varieties of bún in Vietnam. They’re any dish made with rice vermicelli noodles. Add in some grilled fatty pork, fried spring rolls, herbs, pickled veggies and dipping sauces, and you’ve got a delicious meal.

Bun cha gio with shrimp | © @Joefoodie/Flickr

Bun cha gio with shrimp | © @Joefoodie/Flickr

Bánh cuốn

These are a kind of Vietnamese pancake, made by steaming fermented rice batter over a cloth to make thin, wavy sheets. Once you add in the minced shallots, ground pork, mushrooms and some fish sauce, you have a healthy and filling breakfast.

Breakfast cocoons | © Star5112/Flickr

Breakfast cocoons | © Star5112/Flickr

Phở

When people around the world think of Vietnamese cuisine, phở is the first dish that comes to mind. It’s an indispensable part of waking up for many people in Vietnam, and like most of the dishes on this list, phở is a good choice any time of the day.

A murky bowl of flavor | © Star5112/Flickr

A murky bowl of flavor | © Star5112/Flickr

Bò kho

Here’s one of our favorite Vietnamese dishes. We could eat bò kho every single day and be perfectly happy. Is it the healthiest? Probably not – but bò kho is just too delicious. We love dipping bread into the broth until we’ve sopped up every last drop.

Not seen: a flaky baguette | © Guilhem Vellut/Flickr

Not seen: a flaky baguette | © Guilhem Vellut/Flickr

Cơm tấm

This is likely the most customizable dish on this list. It’s a bed of broken rice – the cheapest kind – topped with any number of things, including fish, pork, meat balls, morning glory, pickled veggies and so much more. The options change with every restaurant. Broken rice used to be undesirable, but now many people prefer it.

Simple, yet perfect | © Christopher Crouzet/WikiCommons

Simple, yet perfect | © Christopher Crouzet/WikiCommons

Bò né

Be careful with the fingers when you’re eating this dish, because it comes sizzling on black iron. It looks more Germanic than Vietnamese, but it’s the breakfast of choice for many protein-hungry people here. It’s beefsteak, eggs, sausage, veggies and a baguette – definitely not the breakfast of centenarians.

Bún bò Huế

We already covered one bún dish, but bún bò Huế is unique enough to warrant another spot on this list. It comes from Huế in central Vietnam, the old imperial capital and home to some of the spiciest food in the country. This dish might be a bit too much on a hot day in Ho Chi Minh City, but it’s the perfect way to warm up in the colder regions.

Big bowl of spicy noodles | © Gary Stevens/Flickr

Big bowl of spicy noodles | © Gary Stevens/Flickr

Hu tieu

And finally, yet another bowl of noodles. Hu tieu is popular through much of Southeast Asia, especially in Cambodia. The noodles are doused in a sticky mixture of oyster sauce, soy sauce and sugar. The broth is flavored with pork bones, dried squid, sugar and fish sauce. The dish is served with meats and greens as well, dependent on availability and the tastes of the cook.

Hu Tieu | © Gary Stevens/Flickr

Hu tieu | © Gary Stevens/Flickr

By Matthew Pike